Equipment and Services Available
 
Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)
Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)


ADD and ADHD are neurological conditions affecting both learning and behavior. They result from chronic disturbances in the area of the brain that regulate tasks, motor activity, and social interactions. Hyperactivity may or may not be present. Treatable but not curable, ADD and/or ADHD can lead to lifelong problems.

Accommodations may include:

  • Copies of classmate's notes and/or copies of instructor's notes or overheads
  • Extended time for tests
  • Exams in a quiet, distraction-minimized environment
  • Frequent breaks allowed during exam; exam given by page or by section
  • Clear arrangement of test items on paper
  • Calculator, spell checker, thesaurus, reader, and/or scribe during exams
  • Extended time to complete assignments
  • Tape recorders and/or laptop computers
  • Large print classroom materials
  • Extended time for in-class assignments to correct spelling, punctuation, grammar
  • Instructions or demonstrations presented in more than one way
  • Concise oral instructions
  • Syllabus provided before the start of the semester
Blindness/Visual Impairment
Visual impairments include disorders in the sense of vision that affect the central vision acuity, the field of vision, color perception, or binocular visual function. The American Medical Association defined legal blindness as visual acuity not exceeding 20/200 in the better eye with correction, or a limit in the field of vision that is less than a 20 degree angle (tunnel vision). Tumors, infections, injuries, retrolental fibroplasis, cataracts, glaucoma, diabetes, vascular impairment, or myopia may cause legal blindness. Visual disabilities vary widely. Some students may use a guide dog, or a white cane, while others may not require any mobility assistance.
Accommodations may include:
  • Reading lists or syllabi in advance to permit time for transferring alternate form
  • Textbooks ordered in the preferred medium of the student
  • Seating in the front of the class without glare from windows
  • Tape recording of lectures and class discussions
  • Handouts in the medium that the student prefers
  • Clear black print on white or pale yellow paper for student with visual impairments
  • Testing accommodations such as reading of tests, scribe, extended time, alternate location, and enlarged print.
  • Lab assistance
  • Note takers or note sharing
  • Computer software to enlarge print
Deaf/Hard of Hearing
More individuals in the United States have a hearing impairment than any other type of physical disability. A hearing impairment is any type or degree of auditory impairment, while deafness is an inability to use hearing as a means of communication. Hearing loss may be sensorineural, involving an impairment of the auditory nerve; conductive, a defect in the auditory system that interferes with sound reaching the cochlea; or a mixed impairment, involving both sensorineural and conductive. Hearing loss is measured in decibels and may be mild, moderate, or profound. A person born with a hearing loss may have language deficiencies and exhibit poor vocabulary and syntax. Many students with hearing loss may use a variety of communication methods, including hearing aids, lip reading, cued speech, signed English and/or American Sign Language.
Accommodations may include:
  • Seating which allows a clear view of the instructor, the interpreter, and the blackboard
  • An unobstructed view of the speaker's face and mouth
  • Written supplements of oral instructions, assignments, and directions
  • Providing handouts in advance
  • Visual aids as often as possible
  • Repeating questions and comments from other students
  • Interpreters and/or note takers for class lectures or lab
  • Test accommodations may include: extended time, alternate location, proofreading of essay
  • Tests, access to word processor and interpreted directions
  • Providing unfamiliar vocabulary in written form, on the blackboard, or in a handout
  • Excess noise reduced as much as possible to facilitate communication.
Learning Disabilities
A learning disability is a permanent neurological disorder that affects the manner in which information is received, organized, remembered, and then retrieved or expressed. Students with learning disabilities possess average to above intelligence. The disability is demonstrated by a significant discrepancy between expected and actual performance in one or more of the basic functions: memory, oral expression, listening comprehension, written expression, basic reading skills, reading comprehension, mathematical calculation, or mathematical reasoning.
Accommodations may include:
  • Tape recorders and/or laptop computers
  • Copies of classmate's and/or instructor's notes or overheads
  • Extended time for tests
  • Testing in a quiet, distration-minimized environment
  • Frequent breaks allowed during tests
  • Test given by page or by section
  • Clear arrangement of test items on paper
  • Calculator, spell checker, thesaurus, reader, and/or scribe during tests
  • Alternative form of test, such as an oral test or an essay instead of multiple choice format
  • Extended time to complete assignments
  • Use of handouts and visual aids
  • Extended time for in class assignments to correct spelling, punctuating, and/or grammar
  • Concise oral instructions
  • Instructions and demonstrations presented in more than one way
  • Syllabus provided before the start of the semester.

Physical Disabilities
A variety of orthopedic/mobility-related disabilities result from congenital conditions, accidents, or progressive neuromuscular diseases. These disabilities include conditions such as spinal cord injury (paraplegia or quadriplegia), cerebral palsy, spinal bifida, amputation, muscular dystrophy, cardiac conditions, cystic fibrosis, paralysis, polio/post polio, and stroke. Functional limitations and abilities vary widely even within one group of disabilities. Accommodations vary greatly and can best be determined on a case-by-case basis.
Accommodations may include:
  • Accessible location for the classroom and place to meet with instructor
  • Extra time to get from one class to another, especially in inclement weather
  • Adaptive seating in classrooms
  • Note takers, use of tape recorders, laptop computers, or copies of peer notes
  • Test accommodations: extended time, separate place, scribe, access to word processors
  • Lab assistance
  • Accessible parking in close proximity to the building

Psychiatric Disabilities
Psychiatric disabilities refer to a wide range of behavioral and/or psychological problems characterized by anxiety, mood swings, depression, and/or a compromised assessment of reality. These behaviors persist over time; they are not in response to a particular event. Although many individuals with psychiatric disabilities are stabilized using medications and/or psychotherapy, their behavior and affect may still cycle.
Accommodations may include:
  • Extended time for tests
  • Quiet, distration-free testing area
  • Tests divided into segments with rest breaks
  • Note takers, readers, or tape recorders in class
  • Use of computer or scribe for essay tests
  • Extensions, incompletes, or late withdrawals in the event of prolonged illness
  • Some flexibility in the attendance requirements in case of health related absences
  • Seating arrangement that enhance the learning experience of the student
  • Assistance with time management and study skills

Traumatic Brain Injuries
Head injury is one of the fastest growing types of disabilities, especially in the age range of 15 to 28 years. There is a wide range of differences in the effects of TBI on the individual, but most cases result in some type of impairment. The functions that may be affected include the following: memory, communication, cognitive/perceptual communication, speed of thinking, spatial reasoning, conceptualization, psycho social behaviors, motor abilities, sensory perception, and physical abilities.
Accommodations may include:
  • Tape recorders and/or laptop computers
  • Copies of classmate's and/or instructor's notes or overheads
  • Extended time for tests
  • Tests in a quiet, distraction-free environment
  • Frequent breaks allowed during test; test given by page or by section
  • Clear arrangements of test items on paper
  • Calculator, spell checker, thesaurus, reader, and/or scribe during tests
  • Alternative form of test, such as an oral test or an essay test instead of multiple choice format
  • Extended time to complete assignments
  • Use of handouts and visual aids
  • Instructions or demonstrations presented in more than one way
  • Syllabus provided before the start of the semester
Back to Disability

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Tri-County Community College - 4600 East U.S. 64 - Murphy, NC 28906 - 828-837-6810